Samsung Galaxy S4 3D Printed Custom Phone Case - Birdy Design

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Customize your own 3D printed phone case! These uniquely designed 3D-printed phone cases are the perfect gifts for friends, family or yourself. Choose a bumper color, backplate design and color and enter your favorite word or phrase.


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Cultural Routes: Editorial Design by Another Collective

"Percursos Culturais" (Cultural Routes) is a great editorial series by Another Collective (previously).

"Built by its artists and saved in the memory of its streets, houses and people, this is the city we intend to expand: a city of history, defined by these events that continue to project it to the future day by day. Through multiple itineraries, we show objects, documents, streets and spaces, revisiting multiple histories and myths that allow us to know the way it was developed and built along the centuries."

More graphic design via Behance

Graphic Design Print Design Typography Posted on August 15, 2016
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PPPDDD.1 – What is Domain Driven Design?

Building software that works is not difficult.

What is indeed difficult is to build software that lasts for many years, that keeps working despite the changes needed by the business, needed by the users, needed by new technologies. Building software that is permanently ready for change, and permanently and accurately reflects the business… thats the tricky part.

There are many principles and techniques that help in achieving this goal, like SOLID, GRASP, STUPID, KISS, Law of Demeter, and others. DDD is a set of Patterns, Principles and Practices that help achieve this goal.

Domain-Driven Design (DDD) is a development philosophy defined by Eric Evans in his seminal work Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software (Addison-Wesley Professional, 2003). DDD is an approach to software development that enables teams to effectively manage the construction and maintenance of software for complex problem domains.

Pg.3

In DDD philosophy, the main reason why software becomes complex and difficult to manage, is that the domain concepts are not clear, they tend to get mixed, inaccurate, and therefore rotten. They turn into code that is not structured, sloppy, coupled, opaque, spaghetti, in fact a Big Ball of Mud (BBoM) as defined by Brian Foote and Joseph Yoder in their paper "Big Ball of Mud".

Then, communication is key. The business managers and the developers need a common language to talk about the business concepts. This is key to create a code base that reflects the intent of the business, the business concepts. In DDD, this is common language is called the Ubiquitous Language (UL). The UL is key when domain experts and developers cooperatively build a model of the business concepts, a Domain Model, that can be coded and accurately reflect the intent of the business.

Practices and Principles of DDD

  1. Focus in the core domain
  2. Learn through collaboration between developers and domain experts
  3. Create models through exploration and experimentation, in order to better understand the domain and better reflect it in the code
  4. Communicate clearly and without ambiguity, using a UL and reflecting it within the code
  5. Understand the applicability of a model, segregate it in different models (bounded contexts) when new concepts emerge
  6. Constantly evolve the model as new insights emerge

Misconceptions of DDD

  1. "Tactical patterns are key to DDD"
    Tactical patterns (Design Patterns like Factories, Repositories, Entities, …) are not the most important concepts in DDD. DDD is not a code-centric philosophy, it is in fact all about domain understanding, collaboration and communication.
  2. "DDD is a framework"
    DDD is architecturally agnostic, it does not require a special technical tool. It is about a mindset, and clearly separating the business concepts in bounded contexts.
  3. "DDD is a silver bullet"
    DDD takes effort and is an iterative methodology. It is not an approach to to use in all projects, only in projects with a complex domain who actually requires effort in understanding and modeling.
This post is part of a set of posts with my personal notes about all the chapters in the book "Patterns Principles and Practices of Domain-Driven Design" by Scott Millett and Nick Tune. I will do this as I read through the book, and take notes on the concepts I personally find more relevant.


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Advertising's hot jobs marry content, design, information technology

Latest in an occasional series about recruiters

The employees that advertising agencies want most don't exist.

Employers want digital strategists with 10 to 12 years' experience, "but they aren't going to find anyone, because the field hasn't been around that long," said advertising recruiter Ginger Kochmer.

"There's a shortage of good talent," said Kochmer, who leads the Creative Group in Philadelphia, a specialty recruiting agency within Robert Half International, the worldwide human resource consulting firm.

When it comes to employment trends, specialty recruiters such as Kochmer and Brian Raffle, who opened a Philadelphia advertising practice for Haley Stuart Group, are on the front lines of what is in demand in their sectors.

In the U.S., 499,900 people worked in advertising in July, the Labor Department reported. Payrolls are expanding, with 15,200 jobs added in the last year.

In Philadelphia, jobs are paying above national averages, according to a report by the Creative Group. The report points out three emerging job titles - a creative technologist able to make fast prototypes, a customer-experience designer for online, and a marketing-automation manager, who analyzes lead generation, nurturing, and scoring.

"A lot of clients are looking in the overlap between IT development and what the creatives are doing on the creative side," Raffle said.

Here's how it works:

Imagine a website or mobile app, with products and colors and logos, videos, interactive components, and ways to buy or chat and comment. All that needs to be designed so it looks good, fits the brand image, and reflects the marketing strategy of promotions, television spots, product selection, and price.

Plus, the components need to work together, so that it makes sense to click from page to page, via mobile or laptop.

Obviously, all the hidden coding that makes everything click needs to work and, at the same time, capture customer data and generate leads that can inform the design, the brand, the pricing, and even the product mix.

Managing and understanding all that is the responsibility of a digital strategist and that job, Kochmer said, commands a minimum of $120,000 in the Philadelphia market.

Reporting to that person would be those with expertise in "user experience," or "user interface" - the nuts and bolts of how someone uses a web or mobile site. Is it clunky? Is it annoying? Is it intuitive? Experts in this, Kochmer said, could earn $49,000 to start and up to $184,250 for a director's post.

"There's a zero percent unemployment rate in user experience," Kochmer said.

Raffle said that while a handful of art schools are beginning to teach courses on "user experience," most people learn the discipline on the job as a refinement on web or digital design - two majors that are available in art schools.

"You don't come out of college and get a user experience job," he said.

Employers are also looking for content strategists, Kochmer said. They "make sure there is compelling content, whether it be on web content, e-books, slide decks for pharmaceutical sales, and making sure it is very concise," she said.

"The website home page is dead," she said. "What matters is what you read on your Twitter feed and what's on Facebook."

As important as the digital side is, agencies "can't find enough good copywriters," Raffle said. Of course, the definition of a good copywriter also includes knowing search engine optimization, he said.

A junior copywriter can earn $45,000 while a creative director of copy can get $160,000, Raffle said.

The ability to work with data can help people land jobs in advertising, even if they lack degrees in advertising, marketing, or communications, Raffle said.

"We're seeing folks with psychology degrees with data analytics," he said. The psychologists help agencies run focus groups that measure effectiveness of web designs.

What's not in demand, both agreed, are advertising jobs focused squarely on print. For example, print designers, preprint color specialists, and print production managers would have a harder time getting hired.

Both Kochmer and Raffle said that sign-up bonuses are common and that most new hires expect a sizable annual bonus - as much as 30 percent to 40 percent - based on performance.

Perks also matter, particularly to millennial workers, Raffle said. "They want to be able to work remotely. They want to wear jeans and T-shirts to work." Flexibility in terms of work hours and time off also matters.

Company-funded activities, such as regular happy hours or yoga classes, are a draw too, he said.

jvonbergen@phillynews.com

215-854-2769

@JaneVonBergen

www.philly.com/jobbing


Getting and Staying Ahead

Portfolio: Many advertising agencies look for a portfolio of work. Don't have one? Devise a complete campaign for something - a cause or a product - and build it on the web.

Social media: Use your network to stay on top of digital media trends. Be able to strategize about when to use Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, and others.

Tech: Get familiar or better with coding, particularly HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, also content management systems such as WordPress (most important), Drupal, Joomla. Also Adobe, PhotoShop, and other design software.

College: Study communications, advertising, marketing, graphic design, analytics.

Networking: Participating and learning from industry and tech groups builds connections and shows commitment at all career points, from recent graduates to seasoned professionals in transition.

SOURCE: Advice from advertising recruiters Ginger Kochmer, Brian Raffle


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dubai design week 2016: algae harvester by fredrik ausinsch

dubai design week 2016: fredrik ausinsch's algae harvester converts toxic sea plant into biofuel

aug 15, 2016

dubai design week 2016: fredrik ausinsch's algae harvester converts toxic sea plant into biofuel

dubai design week 2016: 'the algae sea harvester' by fredrik ausinsch is a working prototype that will be presented at the global grad show during the international design event. the project which was realised at the umeå institute of design in sweden – works by collecting and converting excess algae biomass from the sea into fuel, fertilizer, health care products and more.

dubai design week algae harvester fredrik ausinsch
the device works by collecting excess algae biomass from the sea 

'the algae sea harvester' was designed to help combat the unusually high amount of toxic algae found in the baltic sea and works as an innovative drone that essentially eats and stores excess algae – turning it into biofuel. by removing algae from the sea, nutrients and toxins in the water are reduced, the spread of anoxic sediments is prevented and the reproduction of fish improves, which also helps to improve tourism.

the prototype will be on display at dubai design week in october from the 24th to the 29th.

dubai design week algae harvester fredrik ausinsch
the algae is converted into fuel, fertilizer, health care products and more

dubai design week algae harvester fredrik ausinsch

for-article

about dubai design week

the establishment of the dubai design week provides a platform for international design weeks to bring established and emerging brands to a new audience. dubai design week will also provide an opportunity for the MENASA countries to demonstrate their design talent within the dubai design district (D3), for ground-breaking installations to highlight many of the iconic buildings and locations within dubai and to promote design education through a program of talks, discussions and workshops.

about the dubai design district (D3)

dubai design district (D3) is dedicated to fostering the growth of the emirate's design, fashion, art, and luxury industry. it offers businesses, entrepreneurs and individuals a creative community that will be at the very heart of the region's design scene. D3 is a purpose built environment catering to the full value chain of the design, fashion and luxury industry, all with the vision of creating a world class creative community that engages, nurtures and promotes local, regional and global design talent.

designboom has received this project from our 'DIY submissions' feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: hollie smith | designboom

dubai design week I designboom

aug 15, 2016


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Trash meets fashion at Festival of Arts runway show

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Model Erika Baldwin wears an outfit made by artist Brad Elsberry and inspired by the Roman pool at Hearst Castle during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Jackie Rovere models "Nespresso Coffee Couture," a dress made out of Nespresso coffee machine pods, by John Tolle during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Alicia Chavex wears sculptor Casey Parlette's "The Eternal Mermaid," an outfit made out of recycled materials, during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Janell Haney wears "Firebird," a dress made out of an old lab coat and ties, by N.C. Swan during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Julie Holmes wears a dress inspired by vintage Hollywood and made out of VHS tape film by Adam Neely during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Models wait backstage during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Laura Nelson assumes the role of Professor Coral in a dress created by Mariana Nelson and made out of strings and plastic bags. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Julie Holmes wears a dress inspired by vintage Hollywood and made out of VHS tape by Adam Neely. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Audience members watch as models walk down the runway in outfits made of recycled materials. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Sahar Saljooghi models her own creation, "Butterfly Kiss," made out of recycled materials. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Hedy Buzan models her creation, made completely out of garbage found on the beaches of Laguna Beach, during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Beatrice Robinson wears a Harry Potter-themed dress created by Mariana Nelson and made out of strings and plastic bags. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Audience members watch as models walk down the runway in outfits made out of recycled materials. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Marieke van Asselt models a dress made out of old paintings by John Repka during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Model Jackie Rovere models "Nespresso Coffee Couture," a dress made out of Nespresso coffee machine pods, by John Tolle. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

View slideshow

Model Erika Baldwin wears an outfit made by artist Brad Elsberry and inspired by the Roman pool at Hearst Castle during the Festival of Arts Runway Fashion Show on Saturday in Laguna Beach. NICK AGRO , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

One artist used old VHS tapes to make a long strapless gown that drew appreciative exclamations from the audience. Another used plastic bags and thread to make two dresses that looked like they'd been topped with red sea coral.

The competition was tough at the annual Runway Fashion Show at the Festival of Arts in Laguna Beach on Saturday.

The festival's exhibitors, including painters and jewelry makers, compete to create the best outfits made of recycled or reclaimed materials in this annual "Project Runway"-like event. Supermodel Kim Alexis, who appeared on magazine covers from Cosmopolitan to Vogue in the 1980s, was a judge alongside Pageant of the Masters Director Diane Challis Davy and Laguna Beach Arts Commissioner and textile designer Suzi Chauvel.

Actress Joely Fisher, herself a former judge of the fashion show, hosted the event, introducing each design with personal statements and details from the artists.

"I love fashion. It's also a teachable moment," Fisher said during a break while judges tabulated the results. "I love the sentiment of upcycling anything that you find and creating art out of that." With such amazing entries this year, she added, "I don't know how they're going to pick a winner."

Painter Hedy Buzan modeled her own creation, crafted from trash she had collected on 15 visits to the beach. She turned a pink and white towel she found washed up on shore into a dress. Her hat was topped with an incredible variety of trash, such as a can of Red Bull, a child's sand shovel, a flip flop and a spray can of sunscreen.

During her strut down the runway, Buzan held up a plastic serving tray, also found on the beach, with the number 5 on it. The message was to encourage people to pick up five pieces of trash every time they go to the beach.

"I pick up trash all day long every place," Buzan said during the break. "Many people pick up the beach in monthly clean-ups. But if everyone did it every day, it would always be beautiful."

Eleven artists displayed their creations on the runway set up in the middle of the Festival of Arts grounds. There were five awards: most glamorous "red carpet" worthy creation, most creative concept, most exciting ensemble, most innovative use of materials and a people's choice award chosen by votes from the audience.

Judges deemed jewelry maker Adam Neely's creation, "Maven of the Movies," the most glamorous. The strapless gown with a train was covered with tape from VHS cassettes – more than 8,000 feet of vintage film noir footage – that fluttered and made the dress shimmer. His model wore a headpiece of black and gold feathers made from a Native American costume and dry cleaning hangers. Neely also won the people's choice award, no surprise given the audience's reaction when his model glided across the stage.

The most creative concept award went to painter Mariana Nelson for her pair of dresses, one for a woman and one for a little girl. Nelson riffed off the idea of a student at Hogwarts, the wizard school of the Harry Potter series, and her teacher, Professor Coral. Nelson tightly twisted dry cleaning bags, newspaper bags, biohazard bags and thread to make sea creatures and coral to deck out the dresses. The message was that single-use plastic bags are such a problem that they're finding their way into the magical world.

Another pair of gowns won the most exciting ensemble award. Brad Elsberry, a painter, took his inspiration from the elaborate Roman-style swimming pool at Hearst Castle. Thousands of blue and gold candy and gum wrappers went into the bikini-and-short-skirt set worn by one model and the long strapless dress worn by another.

John Tolle, a jewelry maker, received the most innovative award for his "Nespresso Coffee Couture" dress. He sewed loads of the colored disposable capsules for coffee drinks onto a donated dress and topped it off with a hat ringed with dangling Nespresso spoons.

The winner of each award, except the people's choice, received $1,000.

The judges gave an inpromptu award to Buzan at the end for her message of keeping beaches clean.

"We love the sentiment," said Fisher. "We love the inspiration. And we love your outfit!"

Contact the writer: aboessenkool@ocregister.com


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Finding a home for her sense of fashion

"Are we crazy?"

"How do we do this?"

"How do you become the 'it' place to shop in town?"

These are the questions Stephanie Horne and her husband, Brad, asked each other 10 years ago when they were planting Stephanie Horne Boutique in the Third Ward.

"I've always been interested in fashion since I was a little girl, whether it was my hair or what I was wearing," Stephanie Horne said. "It developed when I got into high school and I never wanted to look like everybody else."

Horne grew up in Waupaca, where exposure to fashion was limited. Baby-sitting for a high-end storeowner and shopping at the mall in Appleton was the extent of it.

"We didn't have the internet, so there wasn't online shopping like there is today," Horne said.

Horne studied fashion merchandising at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. After graduating in 1994, she managed a Buckle store in the area and quickly realized that job wasn't for her. A few months later, she began working in outside sales. The job was completely outside the realm of fashion, but she credits that time for giving her the opportunity to hone in on her sales skills — and meet her husband, who worked at the company at that time.

The people who had been around for a while were being replaced with less expensive models, Horne said. She was offered a package and took it. She used this as an opportunity to get back into what she loved: fashion.

"My husband begrudgingly said, 'Let's try this, let's build a website, let's figure out how to buy the things that people want,' " Horne said. "Luckily, he was able to fund me to start."

When the store went online, Horne housed the inventory in her basement. The people who knew her locally wanted to stop by and check out the merchandise.

"My husband said we can't have these people at our house all the time," Horne said.

So the couple began looking for a space, and their store opened in February 2007.

"People were noticing us," Horne said. "It was a time when people spent money freely."

Then in the fall of 2008, the economy crashed and Horne had to determine how to survive. She made her inventory less high-end, cut staff and took the extra hours herself, while raising two school-aged daughters, Sydnie and Mackenzie.

"There were a lot of times where it would have been easier to give up, and I just wasn't willing," Horne said. "Every time your lease renewal comes up, it crosses your mind. But that's when the fire in me starts going again."

The boutique moved in the Third Ward twice before landing at 244 N. Broadway.

Horne had a second location for around three and a half years that moved from Bayshore Town Center to Mayfair, then Blue Mound Road. The second store closed in 2012.

Customer service is one of the biggest reasons the boutique has been able to last, Horne said. A thank-you note is sent to each customer for every purchase.

"Customer service is a lost art. Nobody gives it anymore," Horne said. "We do have some customers that come in and are taken aback."

Horne knows exactly what her customers like and will look good in, said Susan Kuhlenbeck, a customer of Stephanie Horne Boutique for around seven years. Horne sometimes personally delivers pieces to Kuhlenbeck and picks up the items she isn't interested in.

Tabatha Dirubba, who has been a personal stylist and buyer for Stephanie Horne Boutique for almost four years, said Horne has inspired her. "She has a love for this industry and always tries to put her best foot forward with people."

Besides getting to know customers, buying for the store is the best part of the job, Horne said.

"I'm always looking for what I call classics with a twist," Horne said. "That piece that has longevity in your wardrobe and is good quality."

When the store was born, the website took a back seat. The boutique has just reached the point, Horne said, where she can dive back into the internet again. She plans on offering brands and styles that would be risky in Milwaukee, but are more sellable in Los Angeles or New York.

Horne began carrying shoes at the boutique this summer and wants a fully functioning shoe store to blossom within the shop.

"My goal is to bring in lines that are not readily available in town," Horne said.

Beyond that, Horne has no plans to expand. "This is the perfect size to keep it personal," Horne said.

ABOUT THIS FEATURE

This Is Us is a recurring feature in the Journal Sentinel Green Sheet, with stories on the people, places and things reflecting the spirit and heart of our community.

Read or Share this story: http://on.jsonl.in/2biem9K


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